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Richard Johnston, the garden center manager of the Johnston Garden Center and Evergreen Nursery, talks about how to prepare the garden for winter. Submitted photos
Lake Findlay-People naturally think of taking care of their garden in the spring, but in the fall when the flowers wilt?
Recently, Richard Johnston demonstrated at the Findley Lake Community Center that more than 20 people learn about “changing seasons and garden cleaning.” The presentation was sponsored by Community Connections of Findley Lake.
Johnston is the garden center manager of the Erie Johnston Evergreen Nursery and Garden Center. Richard is one of the 15 members of the Johnston family and represents three generations. He worked in the nursery established in 1953.
Johnston talked about several ways to prepare the garden to survive the winter and thrive in the spring of the following year.
“You have to know when your plants will sprout,” he said of preparing for the winter.
Richard Johnston, the garden center manager of the Johnston Garden Center and Evergreen Nursery, talks about how to prepare the garden for winter. Submitted photos
He pointed out that 90% of shrubs and flowers sprout in spring, so they can be pruned in autumn. However, some plants, such as dogwood, cloves, and viburnum, form buds for their flowers in autumn.
Johnston said that in order to avoid snow and winter weather damage, it is important to prepare flowers. An easy way is to tie a rope around the bushes.
Johnston said that many plants also benefit from mulch to protect them from the winter wind. He said that when the ground freezes, the shrubs no longer circulate water to the leaves, and the wind in winter can actually burn part of the plant. He added that shrubs such as broad-leaved evergreens and rhododendrons will be dried by winter wind.
Richard Johnston, the garden center manager of the Johnston Garden Center and Evergreen Nursery, talks about how to prepare the garden for winter. Submitted photos
“People ask,’When do I prune my perennials?’ For ordinary perennials, when the plants look bad, you prune them.”
Johnston said there is room for mistakes. If you trim the shrubs earlier, the shrubs will start to grow again.
Johnston said that most hydrangea varieties are large-leaf plants. In other words, they grow on old wood, he said. When the leaves die, the branches still exist, and new leaves and flower buds are formed on these branches. He added that if one cuts these, they will have no spend.
Johnston also added several “popular perennials”, that is, perennials whose flowers bloom for a long time. He said that for flowers such as daylily and black-eyed Susan, when the flowers wither, they can die for a second time.
Johnston said that other plants, such as cone flowers, galadia and coral bells, do not like moist clay-like ground.
“If you plant it in water, you will kill it. Instead, these varieties need to be stacked in loose humus soil,” he said.
Johnston said that many beautiful flowering plants have new varieties that can allow them to survive our winter. He said that hibiscus, pansy, viola, bee balm, and geranium bloom for a long time and can survive the winter.
Findley Lake’s Community Connections regularly invites experts such as Johnston to share information with the public in their Communi-Tea Room at the community center at 2883 Findley Lake North Road.
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Post time: Nov-01-2021

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